26.6 min readPublished On: October 24th, 2020Categories: MA, Thesis

“How can graphic design be utilised to help improve the lives of individuals suffering from IBD related chronic illness?”

Module: GDE750 – Stage 3: Thesis

Student: Sasha Mitchell

ID: SM227805

Email: sm227805@falmouth.ac.uk

Contents:

1.0 Executive Summary

1.1 Problem

1.2 Solution

1.3 Target Market

1.4 Competition

1.5 Financial Summary

2.0 Opportunity

2.1 Problem Worth Solving

2.2.1 Our Solution

2.2.2 BRIGHT

2.2.3 Products

2.2.4 Monthly Themes

2.3.1 Validation of Problem and Solution

2.3.2 Participatory Research & Ethics Review

2.4 Roadmap/Future Plans

3.0 Market Analysis Summary

3.1 Market Segmentation

3.2 Target Market Segment Strategy

3.2.1 Market Needs

3.2.2 Market Assumptions

3.2.3 Market Growth

3.3 Key Customers

3.5 Competition

4.0 Company and Management Summary

4.1 Organizational Structure

4.2 Management Team

4.3 Personnel Plan

5.0 Financial Plan

5.1 Revenue/Sales Forecast

5.2 Expenses

6.0 Appendix

6.1 Initial Interviews

6.2 Facebook Posts

6.3 Quantitative Survey

7.0 Bibliography

1.0 Executive Summary

1.1 Problem

My project aims to tackle two key problems. In this business plan I will justify how I have found and solidified the following issues:

  1. Negative mental wellbeing of those suffering from fatigue caused by a flare of IBD (Inflammatory Bowel Disease).
  2. Lack of awareness of IBD and the more mentally challenging symptoms that come with it such as fatigue.

1.2 Solution

The solution that I have designed and developed to tackle these problems is BRIGHT. This will be a creative space for those suffering from fatigue caused by chronic illness. Working as a virtual community inspiring the use of creativity as a self-help tool to improve the mental wellbeing of those suffering from symptoms of fatigue during a flare of IBD that also is used to raise awareness of the disease. By focusing on three key areas we can successfully do this.

  1. Positivity
  2. Creativity
  3. Activity

This community will have multiple outputs, with its primary being creative virtual workshops. The concept will be further explored and explained within this business plan.

1.3 Target Market

This solution aims to tackle two key problems, so has two key target markets:

  1. People who are currently in a flare of IBD that are suffering from symptoms of fatigue that want to improve their mental wellbeing.
  2. The general public who are unaware of what IBD is or know little about the disease to raise awareness.

I have targeted a very specific group of people which is further analysed later in this document. I have made assumptions and ideal customer personas to better understand them and in turn create a successful project for the end user.

This community of people is high risk, so when participatory research took place for this project, many precautions were taken that I will further explain later on.

1.4 Competition

Understanding the need for this project came about when I realised there was nothing quite like this available for this specific audience. To better understand the project that I was designing, I have looked into the possible competition that BRIGHT has. The Mighty and Facebook Groups are creating the community aspect that I wish to create, allowing users to start conversations. However, The Gutt stuff is honing in on the product and awareness aspect which I also want to focus on. These competitors are further analysed later on in this business plan.

1.5 Financial Summary

I have designed BRIGHT to be a ‘For Good’ for-profit business. Initially this project will run as a voluntary project to allow all workshops to be free and accessible to anyone. Then develop over time as the community grows. This will allow the project to donate to charities that support and aim to cure IBD. I have developed a breakdown of what is needed to succeed and the three year plan for this project in the financials section of this document.

2.0 Opportunity

2.1 Problem Worth Solving

Inflammatory Bowel Disease is an autoimmune disease that is characterised by the inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. The symptoms include frequent bowel movements, abdominal pain, blood loss, weight loss or gain, and fatigue. We don’t know what causes IBD and there isn’t a cure. There are only treatments to suppress symptoms into remission but in 1 in 4 diagnosed, surgery is required to remove the diseased portion of the bowel. [Crohn’s and Colitis UK, 2020]. The most common reason for fatigue among IBD patients is due to the inability to eat or food passing too quickly through the body means a lack of nutrients absorbed. Headaches, irritability or moodiness, slowed response time, vision problems, aching and a lack of motivation are just a few of the symptoms of fatigue. [Medicalnewstoday.com. 2020]. Up to 86% report feeling fatigued during moderate-to-severely active IBD. Even during remission, about 40% to 50% of patients with IBD disease report fatigue. [IBD.net. 2015].

This illness can be experienced differently for everyone; from the difficulty in receiving a diagnosis due to its taboo nature to absorbing the permanent aspect of the disease. With the addition of fatigue symptoms, the mental wellbeing of patients can become negative quickly.

An IBD patient I interviewed said upon visiting her GP regarding her mental health he told her, “you are depressed, because you are telling me you are not doing the things you normally enjoy doing” and she said, “I get what you are saying, but the reason I’m not doing them is because I am too tired. That’s what I’m sad about. I am probably miserable, but that is because I can’t do the things I want to do. Not the other way round.” [See appendices 6.1]. Although your body is not working your mind is. Knowing that things you did with ease are now painfully strenuous.

During a flare, many are forced into some form of isolation. This is due to many symptoms of the disease, but fatigue can definitely be one of them. Not being able to go about your routine can have an equally as trying time on your social life.

There is a lack of awareness for this invisible symptom, which causes people to believe this is fictitious and somehow attention-seeking. “It’s so hard to explain to anybody else because you look okay, and the assumption is there that you are fine but the concentration does not exist.” [See appendices 6.1]. Having to prove yourself to those closest to you can be extremely frustrating and painful.

2.2.1 Our Solution

“Some experts equate the benefits of crafting-induced flow with the experience of meditation. It’s like a kind of “mental exercise” that helps regulate your attention and emotions. [Creativity] can put you into a physical state of deep relaxation that alters your physical and emotional responses to stress.” [Lifehack. 2020].

Creativity has been proven to improve our mental wellbeing. Even colour is proven to have a real effect on how we feel mentally and physically. Applied Colour Psychologist Karen Haller says, “it can boost your mood, enhance your relationships, turn your home into a haven, help you feel more comfortable in your own skin” [Haller, K., 2019].

Pattern, light and sounds are used for Binaural Meditation [Binaural Sleep Meditation, 2016], a new form of sound therapy. It is used to treat anxiety, stress, as well as many other disorders [Medical News Today. 2019].

There are numerous studies that show that diverse creative disciplines can be used as tools to heal. Whether that is the act of creativity or the outcome being used as the tool to heal.

Due to isolation associated with both a flare of IBD and the fatigue caused by it, there is a great impact on our social lives. Those who take part in a knitting circle are reported to have “greater perceived happiness” and improved social contact and communication with others, which is linked to improved mood and brain health.

With this in mind, I have brought these two proven features together, creativity and community, to create BRIGHT.

2.2.2 BRIGHT

The creative space for those suffering from fatigue caused by chronic illness.

As a believer of the power of colour and creativity, I wanted to create a project that allows people to harness these tools for self-care and positive mental health.

If these unprecedented times have shown us anything, it’s the isolation that chronic illness patients deal with. As well as the community we can create in a digital age. I want to encourage a creative space for patients to both feel togetherness and educate people along the way.

Positivity – Supporting each other with quotes, stories and moments that we all can relate to. This community allows us to come together to share thoughts as an outlet and be heard during times where we can feel isolated.

Creativity – Encouraging us to be creative in whatever field you find the most joy and inspiration, outcomes of personal projects or responses to workshops have the opportunity to be shared on our website and social media. Painting, drawing, crafting, cooking, collaging, blogging, singing, writing music, making music… the list goes on.

Activity – Although the community will encourage you to be creative in whatever outlet you enjoy most, the platform will run virtual activities to get involved in. Pre-recorded or live classes for you to take part in. Still life classes, crafting sessions, cooking lessons.

Discussions will be started around topic points to encourage conversations to take place and the sharing of creative activities and outcomes.The communities feedback and imagery will encourage each other to take part in creative activities. Content will be shared across social media and the BRIGHT website platform (once this is developed).

2.2.3 Products

Workshops – The live creative workshops are the focus product of the project. Initially these will run as free voluntary sessions which will allow IBD and fatigue sufferers a chance to take part. Down the line these may become “pay what you can” as a donation to the project to keep it running. These will work on Zoom, with a maximum of 15 people per session as conversation between patients are encouraged. Simplistic creative exercises will be taking place while also questions regarding wellbeing will be support discussion. There will be monthly themes to base these on. A hands on and relaxed session which works to inspire creativity and foster a community.

Newsletter – These free newsletters will include summaries of our monthly workshops for those who miss the live workshops. Being aware that patients may feel unwell or nervous to take part at the time of the session, this allows them to still reap the benefits of the community. This will include a short description or video demonstration of the creative activity, as well as extra tips and advice from other members that has been shared on the Facebook Group or on the website.

Goodie Boxes – As the project grows, the need for income to keep the project running will be needed. This paid product is aimed as a gift box for yourself or even from friends or family. This box will relate to that month’s theme with products that reflect our three pillars; positivity, creativity and activity.

Journal – An additional product I want to offer is a journal specific to chronic illness patients for when they are going through a flare. The difference to this journal compared to regular diaries, is the ability to track both food and bowel habits. It will also encourage tracking of achievements, no matter how small. This product will help fund the brand and the creative workshops for those who cannot donate.

2.2.4 Monthly Themes

I have planned out some examples of the monthly creative themes that will be used to focus the social media, newsletter, and most importantly the virtual workshops. Each month the theme will shift to a new creative industry to help keep content fresh and allow members to try something new. Changing content each month as opposed to each week means that members have plenty of time to take part in at least one activity that month without feeling pressured that they missed out. While also having the opportunity to take part in lots of activities around that subject if you are feeling up to it.

I wanted to ensure that I am taking into consideration all of the feedback so far. Participatory research was very important to this project as this is a project aimed to aid the target audience. With their feedback, ideas and experiences all shaping this project massively. The survey, as well as responses from the Facebook conversation starters, have shown me the most popular creative hobbies. These included crafting, photography, yarn and thread work, drawing and painting, cooking and baking, as well as seasonal crafts.

A handful of specific activities would be designed prior to the month beginning. However, feedback from the community through social media channels would allow us to base activities on what the community wants to learn, share, and find out more about. The following are the first three ideas for monthly themes. I want to focus these to begin with to gather feedback. Ideally I would like to run three workshops that cover these topics to receive well rounded feedback.

Crafting (paper crafting, jewellery making, collage) – From gathering scraps from magazines to encouraging participants to go out for a walk or even to the garden sometime prior to the workshop to gather leaves, branches, or flowers for a collage workshop. These workshops and activities will inspire people to use what is around them to keep busy.

Photography – Taking in the world around them using their smartphone. This will show participants that you do not need to spend lots of money on a professional camera to be able to start a new hobby. This allows people to take in the world around them and see it from a new perspective. With a range of tasks and challenges to take part in, inspiring those that are novices to experts in the creative field. This could be ‘a photo a day’ challenge, ‘a day in the life of’, or simply starting question conversations that inspires those to respond in image form.

Knitting, crochet, embroidery – This could be a beginners session that teaches you the basics for all three, by taking part you could learn a new skill while also helping other people learn. If you are skilled in knitting but never played around with crochet or vice versa, with the materials you already have you can learn something new with the help of the workshop leader and fellow IBD patients. For the inclusivity of intermediate or advanced skilled people, this may also include the exchange of patterns, tips, tricks and homework for each other. After the workshop, you can go away and try out something you have learnt from the session and share your outcome in the community once completed.

Email newsletters can include patterns, tips, and videos shared. With the future subscription boxes including a ball of yarn and a crochet hook or knitting needles.

2.3.1 Validation of Problem and Solution

I have gathered a range of feedback from starting from the insight of the problems those suffering with IBD face all the way to reaching out to charities.

It is important to see that there is evidence that this project is successful. To ensure this, I reached out to many IBD sufferers to see whether they would take part, with 83% of people saying they would be interested [see appendices 6.3]. I also got in touch with some already existing communities for IBD patients and other chronic illnesses to see what they think of the idea. Sahara, a founder of #IBDSuperheros believes, “it comes across as light hearted and fun, as well as having a purpose! Also love the journal idea.” Feedback like this is great, but to really know the potential that it has, I need to test it out.

The initial stage of executing this project is gathering feedback from patients, and to do this I need to run creative workshops with patients. At the moment I do not have a community of people so I want to collaborate with people who have already created their own community to provide them with creative sessions. One charity that is interested in taking part is RHL already. With my first session being booked for December with their coffee morning participants of around 15 people. Rushmoor Healthy Living is a wonderful charity in my local area that focuses on improving the health and wellbeing of those suffering from long term conditions and disabilities. Although they are not IBD patients, they all understand the struggle of fatigue.

This session will be my first test on the live workshops, which allow me to see what does and doesn’t work. Helping me to develop this project to better help solve my chosen problem.

2.3.2 Participatory Research & Ethics Review

Due to the high risk nature of this project I had to run an ethics review. The risks I had were that the participants were patients, as well as this they may feel discomfort in sharing very personal experiences or opinions. I had to ensure the confidentiality of the people taking part in my research were safe and secure. I ensured that all participants had a right to withdraw at any time and that they were happy with their responses being shared for this project.

Participatory research was very important to this project as this is a project aimed to aid the target audience. The outcomes of my research, the conversations that I started as well as surveys were all an influential part in the decisions throughout the project. Their feedback, ideas and experiences have all shaped this project massively. From my initial interviews telling me that fatigue was the key debilitating factor of their illness, to over 60 responses from people telling me what creative hobbies they find helps them personally.

2.4 Roadmap/Future Plans

The plan is to build up the social platforms as the initial space for connecting. Here I can develop the brand, explaining what BRIGHT is and gathering initial feedback from this idea. With a Facebook Group I can start inviting members and creating conversations. I then want to focus my attention on running the free creative workshops and spreading the message of using creativity as a self-help tool.

3.0 Market Analysis Summary

3.1 Market Segmentation

Here are a number of key features of the target audience:

  • Age – 18+ – IBD patients can be diagnosed from a very early age. However, due to it being an online community with the ability to share stories, they would need to be over the age of 18. Members can range from young to old, with some of the people I interviewed being over the age of 70, I do not want to limit the maximum age for my target market.
  • Gender – Equal – Although I have found women to be more interested in sharing their opinions, experiences and advice, I want to encourage men to take part equally.
  • Illness – IBD and Fatigue – The community is aimed at those suffering from Inflammatory Bowel Disease and more specifically those currently in and flare and/or dealing with the Fatigue as a symptom.
  • Uses technology – BRIGHT is 100% virtual. This is to help make it more accessible for those suffering from fatigue from IBD. This means that the users must have a smartphone, laptop or computer to access the BRIGHT community. They also need to be comfortable using their device.
  • Creative – This project encourages creativity. It is aimed at people who are already creative and take part in creative hobbies and wishes to share them, as well as encouraging people who do not believe they are creative to take part in creative activities they wouldn’t normally. This means the target audience would have to be open to creativity as a self-help tool.
  • Social – The audience will be a part of a social community and will have the opportunity to take part in Virtual Workshops and share ideas. However, if people do not want to be as visible, they can view the content of others and watch summaries of the virtual workshops. This allows for wider accessibility for patients that may not feel comfortable taking part right away or at all.
  • Location – UK/Global – As the community is virtual there is no limits to where the users are from. Initially though I will be targeting the UK as a starting point.

3.2 Target Market Segment Strategy

BRIGHT aims to tackle two key problems so has two key target markets:

  1. People who are currently in a flare of IBD that are suffering from symptoms of fatigue that want to improve their mental wellbeing.
  2. The general public who are unaware of what IBD is or know little about the disease to raise awareness.

3.2.1 Market Needs

There is a highly negative impact on mental wellbeing during a flare of Inflammatory Bowel Disease, and more so with the debilitating symptom of fatigue that can come with it. It is physically and mentally isolating and can quickly become difficult to maintain positive activities and communication.

There are many ways that we connect with each other from a distance using virtual communities and social platforms. This is being done to aid the chronic illness community already through campaigns, by businesses and influencers alike. More specifically we can see this being used to aid those suffering from IBD and the symptom of fatigue that comes along with it.

We also see people sharing creative activities as a tool to aid our mental wellbeing. The way in which we use colour in our surroundings to alter how we feel for the better. There are people taking part in virtual creative workshops.

However, nobody has yet brought the two together. Taking both ideas of a community and creativity, we can create a space that successfully aids the mental wellbeing of those suffering from fatigue caused by IBD specifically.

3.2.2 Market Assumptions

  1. Those suffering from fatigue related to IBD are seeking ways to improve their mental wellbeing.
  2. These people would want to join a community with people who understand what they are going through.
  3. They would like to take part in creative activities.
  4. These people want to share their stories and thoughts.
  5. People are willing to find out more about IBD and what it is.

3.2.3 Market Growth

There is a potential increase in the size of my target market. The number of people diagnosed with IBD in the UK is consistently rising. “Ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease prevalence increased by 55% and 83% respectively between 2000 and 2017, the data showed. Meanwhile, IBD prevalence is predicted to rise by almost a quarter between 2017 to 2025.” [Huffingtonpost.co.uk. 2020]. This means that we need to support this growing population as much as we can. BRIGHT has growth to reach more members and raise awareness for this significant illness as time goes on.

3.3 Key Customers

The ideal customer archetype that will be the main advocate for BRIGHT is:

  • Someone who lives by themselves.
  • In a flare of IBD suffering from fatigue.
  • Rarely leaves the house during their flare.
  • Not working or working from home during their flare
  • Finds it hard to explain or discuss their symptoms to friends, families and colleagues.
  • Feels isolated
  • Aware of their mental wellbeing
  • Wants to do something to keep active and positive during this time
  • Creative or wants to do something creative as they are aware they need to keep busy

3.5 Competition

The MightyThe community aspect is already being created for chronic illness patients by The mighty. A place where people with mental and physical illnesses can talk to others with the same issues and share stories. This is a great place to exchange similar experiences, working as a journal. The site covers over 600 different conditions. The platform provides a space for its users to communicate, however, the platform itself does not provide any events or products. It completely consists of its users’ content. They use this content to raise awareness of chronic illnesses and normalise them.

This is definitely what I am aiming to do with my project. However, this is focusing on only one pillar, ’positivity’, and solving only one of my problems, which is raising awareness. This is where ‘creativity’ and ‘activity’ need to come in to utilise the power of graphic design to empower positive wellbeing.

Facebook Groups – Pages and groups can be created by anyone, nowadays we see so many of these for specific topics, locations, and people. There are many virtual support groups out there for Inflammatory Bowel Disease patients and for those suffering from fatigue as a symptom. They create a community which allows conversation between like-minded people. It also works as a great way to source informal advice and information first hand.

I want to create conversations between members but do not want this to be a source for information regarding their illness. Rather, I want the conversation topics to be around forms of self-help tips. This is where the pillar ‘activity’ comes in. Although I want to use BRIGHT to encourage ‘creativity’ as a self-help tool, this space can be used to share other ideas from the members’ real-life experience. A BRIGHT Facebook group will help this with correct maintenance and administration.

The Gut Stuff – Empowering gut health in everyone, but aimed at people suffering from IBS. Raising awareness of the illness as well as providing advice. The Gutt Stuff runs events, popups and campaigns revolving around gut health. Focusing primarily on Irritable Bowel Syndrome, they want to raise awareness for this common illness in a playful lighthearted way. Their business offers products to aid self-care. This includes their IBS journal that includes all the important entry sections that are useful for those suffering from the illness.

This campaign has inspired this project as it shows you can use playful design to inspire self-care. The products they offer do this successfully for IBS patients, so I wanted to transfer some of these ideas for those suffering from fatigue caused by IBD. The journal is a great example of this. Many people have attempted creative a journal for IBD sufferers, including smartphone applications, however, they are too clinical. The Gutt Stuff has been successful in theirs because it is appealing.

4.0 Company and Management Summary

4.1 Organizational Structure

This project will initially be run by myself during its initial voluntary phase gathering insight of the success of the business. Key areas that need to be focused on are:

  • Initial development of the website
  • Content management of the website
  • Marketing the community
  • Producing the posts from submitted artwork

These will all be taken care of by myself to begin with but as the project grows this may need to be handled by multiple members of a team.

4.2 Management Team

I anticipate that the management of the project will be myself until the project picks up and goes into its “For Profit” stage. The project will then be better taken care of by someone else who has experience in the role of project manager. Their focus will primarily be on how to keep it running smoothly and how the business will develop. I currently do not have a candidate ready, but they will be sourced once the business is showing success of growth over the first 12 month period

4.3 Personnel Plan

Positions that I expect the project will require in order to run effectively in the potential future.

  • Project manager – keep the project running and growing.
  • Creative practitioners – to run the creative workshops and design the monthly themes.
  • Community engagement manager – engage with the community to start conversations and gather potential members.
  • Content managers (design & marketing) – to run marketing, organise submissions from clients, produce designed assets for the project working alongside the creative practitioners.

5.0 Financial Plan

5.1 Revenue/Sales Forecast

This will be a ‘For Good’ for-profit business. Initially this project will run as a voluntary project to allow all workshops to be free and accessible to anyone. This will not only allow me to get feedback and develop the project but gain support and grow the community. Over time as the community grows the aim is to then start developing the platform which will need financial support to do this. This is when the paid products will become available to support the continuation of the project. The majority of proceeds of the project will go back into advertising the posts to outreach and raise awareness.

As well as this, I want to be able to support charities that directly support the target audience. Those searching for a cure and medications for Inflammatory Bowel disease such as Crohn’s & Colitis UK.

5.2 Expenses

1st Year 2nd Year 3rd Year
Startup Costs £ Notes
Website 500 Software/features/plugins
Website build 1500 Man hours (£15ph x 100 hours)
2000 N/a N/a
Fixed Assets £ Notes
Equipment 1500 3000 6000 Computers, desk, hard drives etc.
Rent/building 0 0 0 This would be an accessible business with full-time work from home capabilities
1500 3000 6000
Operating Capital £ (pcm) Notes
Salaries 2500 5000 10000 Start off with just me, but hiring people to maintain social/website
Advertising 1000 2000 4000 This will fluctuate with growth
Legal & accountancy fees 100 100 100
Website 100 200 400 Monthly maintenance, paid plugins, updates, improvements etc.
3700 7300 14500
Profit £ (pcm) Notes
Charity Donation 25% 50% 75% This will be from remaining income after monthly costs have been removed.
Growth 75% 50% 25% Remaining will go back into the growth of the business

6.0 Appendix

6.1 Initial Interviews

Prior to designing this project concept, I interviewed a range of people closely affected by IBD. I want to gain knowledge about their own personal experiences with the disease and their opinions on it. I also wanted to hone in on the feeling of isolation and loneliness that can be caused due to symptoms. This is an assumption that I made at the beginning of this project and I needed to focus on this and prove it is true and if so what is the cause of this isolation. This allowed me to attempt to resolve it during my project. As advised by Tim Shaw from Hospital Rooms, I asked open-ended questions to gain more unique and engaging feedback that will help my project.

See full responses from all the interviews here.

6.2 Facebook Posts

I wanted to start some conversations with IBD patients to get to know more about their experience with fatigue and creativity. To do this I posted some conversation starter questions on IBD pages on Facebook. I have taken all names away from comments for animosity. Follow this link to see responses for the following conversation starters.

6.3 Quantitative Survey

After developing my project I wanted to get some hard evidence to back up my project concept. I wanted to ensure that there is a market need for this project, as well as clear evidence that this concept could be successful. I used multiple choice questions so I could visually see the responses in the form of graphs. The survey responses and analysis can be found here.

7.0 Bibliography

Binaural Sleep Meditation: Binaural beats for deep sleep, theta brain waves meditation, 2016. [Video] URL <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4pHI5MlDgps> [Accessed 7 October 2020].

Crohns And Colitis UK. 2020. About Crohn’S And Colitis. [online] Available at: <https://www.crohnsandcolitis.org.uk/about-crohns-and-colitis> [Accessed 15 October 2020].

Haller, K., 2019. The Little Book Of Colour: How To Use The Psychology Of Colour To Transform Your Life.

Huffingtonpost.co.uk. 2020. Huffpost Is Now A Part Of Verizon Media. [online] Available at: <https://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/entry/lifelong-bowel-diseases-are-on-the-rise-why-is-this-happening_uk_5daebc26e4b0422422caf69a?guccounter=1&guce_referrer=aHR0cHM6Ly93d3cuZ29vZ2xlLmNvbS8&guce_referrer_sig=AQAAAMv1T720ITMAtDQahLn8TUElx21EGGsEbADMsXl3Q6h8DmVME1lbiWeUK92y8OR4rvs_fV2BUaN0T17gU4CUtlc0IMYxr8yI2nF6MKmo00MisIVzWXku6XSCG7SRiI-CZeXXIHTo7X_wnqKV1tMnggiav2x4CLICafNcNcaErUeb> [Accessed 15 October 2020].

IBD.net. 2015. Fatigue. [online] Available at: <https://inflammatoryboweldisease.net/symptoms/fatigue/#:~:text=Even%20during%20remission%2C%20about%2040,with%20IBD%20disease%20report%20fatigue.> [Accessed 15 October 2020].

Lifehack. 2020. How Being More Creative Improves Your Mental And Physical Health. [online] Available at: <https://www.lifehack.org/articles/lifestyle/how-being-more-creative-improves-your-mental-and-physical-health.html> [Accessed 15 October 2020].

Medical News Today. 2019. Binaural beats therapy: Benefits and how they work [Online] Available at: <https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/320019> [Accessed 9 October 2020].

Medicalnewstoday.com. 2020. Fatigue: Why Am I So Tired, And What Can I Do About It?. [online] Available at: <https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/248002#causes> [Accessed 15 October 2020].

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